Institutional Transformations

Formal and informal institutions structure our social interactions by giving rise to normative expectations and patterns of collective behaviour. This collection grapples with how affect, imagination, and embodiment can operate to either constrain or enable the justice of institutions and the experiences of specific social identities. This anthology explores the myriad ways institutions work to systematically disadvantage people with particular identities whilst privileging others, and considers the legal, political, and normative interventions that might serve to promote a more just society. Taken together, the chapters represent the scope of existing research within institutional theory, affect theory, race theory, and theories of social imaginaries. Across a range of topics (human rights, racial and sexual violence, transitional justice and democratic movements) this collection critically assesses the extent to which theorists have attended to the conjoined influence of the imagination, embodiment, and affective phenomena on processes of institutional change that aim to achieve social justice. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of the journal, Angelaki.

Institutional Transformations

Formal and informal institutions structure our social interactions by giving rise to normative expectations and patterns of collective behaviour. This collection grapples with how affect, imagination, and embodiment can operate to either constrain or enable the justice of institutions and the experiences of specific social identities. This anthology explores the myriad ways institutions work to systematically disadvantage people with particular identities whilst privileging others, and considers the legal, political, and normative interventions that might serve to promote a more just society. Taken together, the chapters represent the scope of existing research within institutional theory, affect theory, race theory, and theories of social imaginaries. Across a range of topics (human rights, racial and sexual violence, transitional justice and democratic movements) this collection critically assesses the extent to which theorists have attended to the conjoined influence of the imagination, embodiment, and affective phenomena on processes of institutional change that aim to achieve social justice. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of the journal, Angelaki.

Structural and Institutional Transformations in Doctoral Education

This book analyses the structural and institutional transformations undergone by doctoral education, and the extent to which these transformations are in line with social, political and doctoral candidates' expectations. Higher education has gone through profound changes driven by the massification and diversification of the student body, the rise of neoliberal policies coupled with the reduction in public funding and the emergence of the knowledge society and economy. As a result, higher education has been assigned new and more outward-looking missions, which have subsequently affected doctoral education. The editors and contributors examine these transformations and changes at the macro, meso and micro levels: wider and more structural changes as well as doctoral candidates' experience of the degree itself. This book will be of interest and value to scholars of doctoral education and the transformation of the university more widely.

Institutional Transformations, Polity and Economic Outcomes

This paper tests the theoretical framework developed by North, Wallis and Weingast (2009) on the transition from closed to open access societies. They posit that societies need to go through three doorsteps: (i) the establishment of rule of law among elites; (ii) the adoption of perpetually existing organizations; and (iii) the political control of the military. We identify indicators reflecting these doorsteps and graphically test the correlation between them and a set of political and economic variables. Finally, through Identification through Heteroskedasticity we test these relationships econometrically. The paper broadly confirms the logic behind the doorsteps as necessary steps in the transition to open access societies. The doorsteps influence economic and political processes, as well as each other, with varying intensity. We also identify income inequality as a potentially important force leading to social change.

Institutional and Organizational Transformations in the Robotic Era: Emerging Research and Opportunities

Scholars agree that change has become a staple in organizational life and will likely remain as such beyond the twenty-first century. As the rate of change continues to accelerate, organizations must strive to develop and implement new initiatives in order to obtain significant benefits for organizational survival, economic viability, and human satisfaction. Institutional and Organizational Transformations in the Robotic Era: Emerging Research and Opportunities is an essential reference source that explores some of the common characteristics of the recent technology transformations and the characteristics of the industrial revolutions. It analyzes recent changes in the global economy, providing evidence of expanding social issues that can undermine further sustainable development. This book is ideally designed for policymakers, academics, professionals, managers, administrators, and others interested in organizational change through technological advances.

Balancing the Commons in Switzerland

"Balancing the Commons in Switzerland outlines continuity and change in the management of common-pool resources such as pastures and forests in Switzerland. The book focusses on the differences and similarities between local institutions (rules and regulations) and forms of commoners' organisations (civic communities, corporations) which have managed common property for several centuries and have shaped the cultural landscapes of Switzerland. The core of the book are five case studies from the German, French and Italian speaking regions of Switzerland. Beginning in the late medieval ages and focussing on the transformations in the 19th and 20th century, it traces the internal and external political, economic and societal changes and examines what impact these changes had on commoners. It goes beyond the work of Robert Netting and Elinor Ostrom, who discussed Swiss commons as a unique case of robustness, by analysing how local commoners reacted to, but also shaped changes by adapting and transforming common property institutions. Thus, the volume highlights how institutional changes in the management of the commons (pastures, forest) on the local level are embedded in the public policies of the respective cantons (provinces), and the state, which generates a high heterogeneity and an actual laboratory situation (Swiss lab). It shows the very different ways that local collective organisations and their members have followed in order to try to cope with the loss of value of the commons and the increased workload for maintaining common property management. Providing insightful case studies of commons management, this volume delivers lessons to be learned for the commons worldwide and for the general theoretical debate on the commons. It is published on the 30th anniversary of Ostrom's Nobel Prize winning title Governing the Commons from which it gets its name. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of the commons, natural resource management and agricultural development"--

The Transformation of University Institutional and Organizational Boundaries

An emerging issue in higher education studies is that of boundaries crossing. This is the main topic of the book “The transformation of University institutional and organizational boundaries”. Several signals of shifting boundaries can be envisaged in higher education and research institutions which could be glimpsed through organizations, the institutions and changes to the academic profession. That of boundaries crossing in Higher Education is a complex and heterogeneous issue, which characterizes scientific knowledge today and represents a key issue when looking at University transformations across contexts and policies, instruments and practices. The analysis of boundaries supplies interpretative frameworks for the interactions between the development of professions and disciplines, as well as the relationships of the science with various parts of society such as state, professionals and the market. Fuelling further the discussion on HEIs transformations allows capturing changes in the function, objectives and scope of higher education and research institutions, the move beyond sectoral and disciplinary boundaries and the increasingly blurred boundaries of academic professions and of scientific work. Public policies and HE reforms can push or impede the mentioned transformations but they can also derive from individual likelihood of moving in blurring spaces or from the transformations of the epistemic communities and the emergence of new fields and sectors. Hence, changes are there, open to our observations.

Great Transformations

This book picks up where Karl Polanyi's study of economic and political change left off. Building upon Polanyi's conception of the double movement, Blyth analyzes the two periods of deep seated institutional change that characterized the twentieth century: the 1930s and the 1970s. Blyth views both sets of changes as part of the same dynamic. In the 1930s labor reacted against the exigencies of the market and demanded state action to mitigate the market's effects by 'embedding liberalism.' In the 1970s, those who benefited least from such 'embedding' institutions, namely business, reacted against these constraints and sought to overturn that institutional order. Blyth demonstrates the critical role economic ideas played in making institutional change possible. Great Transformations rethinks the relationship between uncertainty, ideas, and interests, achieving profound new insights on how, and under what conditions, institutional change takes place.

Great Expectations, Slow Transformation

n the aftermath of the financial crisis, why has the reform process been incremental yet the conditions for more rapid and abrupt transformations appeared to be available? Is there anything specific about financial policy that prevents more radical reforms? Drawing from Comparative Politics and Historical Institutionalism in particular, as well as International Political Economy, this book answers these questions by examining the particular institutional frictions that characterise global financial governance and influence the activity of change agents and veto players involved in the process of global regulatory change. The chapters in this volume collectively demonstrate that the process of change in financial rule-making as well as in the institutions governing finance does not fit with the punctuated model of policy change. The book also shows, however, that incremental changes can lead to fundamental shifts in the basic principles that inform global financial governance.

The Institutional Economics of Russia's Transformation

This book applies institutional theory to the analysis of the post-Soviet Russian economy to bring to light the reasons why reforms have gone awry. Emphasis is put on the elements missed in the early blueprints of reforms: constraints embodied in formal and especially informal institutions. Other aspects considered include the dominant model of power relationships and the networks of localized and personalized relationships among economic actors. The first part provides a general description of the core concepts of institutional theory, including both the 'old' institutionalism of T. Veblen and J. Commons and the 'new' institutional economics of R. Coase, O. Williamson and D. North, and in the second part an institutional model of the post-Soviet Russian economy is developed. In the course of the analysis the authors discuss such unresolved issues as post-privatization development in Russia and validity of the Coase theorem in the post-Soviet institutional context. Rich empirical data grounds the discussion throughout.

The Institutional Dynamics of China's Great Transformation

This book examines the role of institutions in China’s recent large-scale economic, social and political transformation. Unlike existing literature, it offers perspectives from a variety of disciplines - including law, economics, politics, international relations and communication studies – to consider whether institutions form, evolve and change differently according to their historical or cultural environments and if their utilitarian functions can, and should be, observed, identified and measured in different ways.

Crisis Narratives, Institutional Change, and the Transformation of the Japanese State

Looking at Japan, traces crisis narratives across three decades and ten policy fields, with the aim of disentangling discursively manufactured crises from actual policy failures. Mired in national crises since the early 1990s, Japan has had to respond to a rapid population decline; the Asian and global financial crises; the 2011 triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami, and the Fukushima nuclear meltdown; the COVID-19 pandemic; China’s economic rise; threats from North Korea; and massive public debt. In Crisis Narratives, Institutional Change, and the Transformation of the Japanese State, established specialists in a variety of areas use a coherent set of methodologies, aligning their sociological, public policy, and political science and international relations perspectives, to account for discrepancies between official rhetoric and policy practice and actual perceptions of decline and crisis in contemporary Japan. Each chapter focuses on a distinct policy field to gauge the effectiveness and the implications of political responses through an analysis of how crises are narrated and used to justify policy interventions. Transcending boundaries between issue areas and domestic and international politics, these essays paint a dynamic picture of the contested but changing nature of social, economic, and, ultimately political institutions as they constitute the transforming Japanese state. Sebastian Maslow is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Sendai Shirayuri Women’s College in Japan. He is the coeditor (with Ra Mason and Paul O’Shea) of Risk State: Japan’s Foreign Policy in an Age of Uncertainty. Christian Wirth is Research Fellow at the German Institute for Global and Area Studies (GIGA) and Adjunct Research Fellow at the Griffith University Asia Institute. He is the author of Danger, Development and Legitimacy in East Asian Maritime Politics: Securing the Seas, Securing the State.

Institutional Transformation To Engage A Diverse Student Body

Helps readers engage with a number of core higher education (HE) issues that have dominated UK and International policy. This title helps them in developing the concept of institutional transformation and student engagement to widen participation in HE and improve student retention and success.

Experimental Practice

In Experimental Practice Dimitris Papadopoulos explores the potential for building new forms of political and social movements through the reconfiguration of the material conditions of existence. Rather than targeting existing institutions in demands for social justice, Papadopoulos calls for the creation of alternative ontologies of everyday life that would transform the meanings of politics and justice. Inextricably linked to technoscience, these “alterontologies”—which Papadopoulos examines in a variety of contexts, from AIDS activism and the financialization of life to hacker communities and neuroscience—form the basis of ways of life that would embrace the more-than-social interdependence of the human and nonhuman worlds. Speaking to a matrix of concerns about politics and justice, social movements, matter and ontology, everyday practice, technoscience, the production of knowledge, and the human and nonhuman, Papadopoulos suggests that the development of alterontologies would create more efficacious political and social organizing.